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Does Jewish tradition teach us anything that might explain the origin of the name Yisha'yahu/Isaiah/יְשַׁעְיָהוּ?

I am referring to the prophet who bore the name. If his name means, as it seems to, "G-d is salvation," what might be the meaning behind it? From what, exactly, might his parents have been hoping to be saved? Based on what we know from the biblical narrative and Jewish commentary, was the political instability in the House of David felt throughout the land at the time of his birth? Was the eventual invasion of the Assyrian army seen as inevitable or likely? Was there something else going on? Or does it just seem to be a nice name?

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why does naming a child need to be for a cause which is happening or happened? It can be out of love for HaShem that they named him this way as well. –  MoriDoweedhYaa3qob Jul 3 '13 at 17:33
    
@MoriDoweedhYaAgob, that's certainly true. Is that the case here? "G-d is salvation" connotes something from which to be saved; perhaps he was born on Pesah? –  Seth J Jul 3 '13 at 17:38
    
if it were the case I would write it as an answer and not a comment. I am not looking at the Sefer now to analyze it. So I don't know when he was born or anything like that at the moment. However you can look at many names in tanach which have similar positions to them. I don't think each and everyone was named after an event, –  MoriDoweedhYaa3qob Jul 3 '13 at 17:45
    
@MoriDoweedhYaAgob, part of what motivates my question is that he is the first person we have a record of with that name. It's a very common name now, but if you're going to make up a name from your own creativity, presumably you have some inspiration and are not just lumping syllables together to see what sounds nice. If that were the case, they got pretty lucky to get some syllables that mean something. Dare I say there must have been Divine assistance involved? –  Seth J Jul 3 '13 at 17:49
    
Yahoshu3 bin nun. Was named Hoshe3. But was changed by Mosha Rabbeinu. But it is a quite common way to end a name in this time period I think. If you look in his time period, you can see others with a similar suffix. –  MoriDoweedhYaa3qob Jul 3 '13 at 17:53
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