Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a contemporary published hagada with commentary, how many total words does the commentary typically comprise? (For comparison, "Hagada - Mi Yodeya?", in its current form, weighs in at about 14,000 words of commentary.)

More broadly:

If someone wanted to bring a manuscript for a hagada commentary to publishers to consider for publication as a full-fledged hagada, what characteristics would the manuscript ideally have, to be taken as seriously as possible?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure there is a "typical" commentary by which to judge some standard length. I have an old copy of a Haggadah published by the Staten Island Yeshivah from 1947, which is pamphlet-length in its entirety, despite having a good deal of commentary throughout, and the "Torat Hyim" Haggadah, which is over 200 pages long, despite its mostly short commentaries included. Of course, in the latter, each passage of the Haggadah has several commentators' writings.

My personal feeling is that a Haggadah's commentary ought to be engaging to the reader, however long it may be. To the point, the Nechama Leibowitz Haggadah, which my wife favors, is 159 total pages and contains, "over 100 analytical questions relating to the Passover Seder and the Exodus from Egypt...extracted from Nechama's renowned weekly Torah study sheets." Yet its style keeps the reader engaged, and it can be used to study from in preparation for the Seder or to pull up a quick Devar Torah at the Seder itself.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Two things. First the various commentaries vary greatly in length. For instance Rav Benayahu Shmueli published one(his shortest) Shm'a Beni at about 30k words(of commentary) and his third(and longest) Musar Avikha at three times that. The same can be said with the various commentaries by famous Rabbanim through the ages.

As far as publishing, you will find that most often these are self-published. I don't know of a commentary that was published in the lifetime of the Rav by a publisher. Usually the individual pays for their own publication and distribution. In a few generations when it has become a classic(G-d willing) a publisher may pick it up.

share|improve this answer
    
Speaking of commentaries of different lengths, we can't forget the king of expanded commentaries: he.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Double AA Apr 10 '13 at 3:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.