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What is the step by step method of Kashering for the method of 'Iruy?

Assume I've never done it before, and I am taking a recently used, non-Kosher metal sink for Passover. (Maybe I'm in a hotel.) It needs to be made Kosher, Parve, and Pesachdik.

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You are assuming that you can even kosher a used metal sink. What about the opinions that say that the seal between the drain and the sink becomes a problem, which you cannot kasher? –  Rabbi Michael Tzadok Mar 21 '13 at 2:25
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@mekubal: To play devil's advocate to your devil's advocate, the major Sephardic practice (acc. to R. Ovadia) allows kashering even a porcelain sink and the seal is not an issue. –  Aryeh Mar 21 '13 at 7:18
    
@Aryeh you are correct. I'm just pointing out that one answer does not fit all. –  Rabbi Michael Tzadok Mar 21 '13 at 7:47
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2 Answers 2

1) Clean the sink thoroughly.

2) Do not use anything hot in the sink for 24 hours.

3) Boil water in a Peasachdik pot/kettle.

4) Pour that water over every surface of the sink.

5) Rinse the sink with cold water.

As always, CYLOR.

Source: 2013 Star-K Passover Directory

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You should include a source for this if you can. –  Double AA Mar 21 '13 at 5:19
    
@msh210 Your edit makes sense, but I have seen "hot water" mentioned specifically rather than "anything hot". –  andrewmh20 Mar 21 '13 at 17:02
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According to some opinions, like those who are machmir on rov tashmishan and/or davar gush, hold that irui m'kli rishon is not enough, and actual hagala is required. <​/jargon> I believe these opinions are brought by both the Shulchan Aruch HaRav and the Mishna Berurah. <​source needed>

Accordingly, step 4 in andrewmh20's excellent answer would be amended to:

4) Pour that [heated] water over a heated stone or iron, moving the stone around the sink and pouring over it in each location.

Alternatively, if one doesn't want to do that, one could fill the sink to the brim, and then use an immersion heater to boil that water. With that method, it may be necessary to drop a hot stone in in order to cause the boiling water to overflow and cover the edges of the sink.

As always, CYLOR.

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