Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The Rambam in yesode hatorah says that God has no emotions.

He does not change, he does not get angry nor have joy. Everything you see in tanach is just so that we can understand.

The commentary there says: "he does not get angry if you transgress nor get joy from your doing His will".

If so, why does he care about our service? Is it all for us only?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Does God benefit from our keeping of the Mitzvos? –  HodofHod Jan 28 '13 at 15:33
    
Also related and a near duplicate: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/10203/883 –  HodofHod Jan 28 '13 at 15:35
    
@HodofHod, the other question asks whether God benefits, and the other question asks whether we affect his mood. This assumes neither is the case and asks why we have mitzvos. (Or am I reading somehing wrong?) –  msh210 Jan 28 '13 at 19:09
2  
@msh210 "why does he care about our service? is it all for us only?" Seems to be the same as "does G-d benefit?" –  HodofHod Jan 28 '13 at 20:20
add comment

2 Answers 2

Kabbalists make a distinction (which may or may not be attractive to different people) between the אין סוף, the Infinite one that is completely beyond us, and the emanated פרצופים 'faces' of God. Our actions could never have an effect on the אין סוף, the Infinite one, but he has willed that they have an effect on emanations which are, at the same time, of Him, and just a garment of Him:

כהדין קמצא, דלבושיה מיניה וביה

"...like the snail, whose garment [shell] is of him and part of him..."

(cf., for example, ערוגת הבשם on Song of Songs, intro, 'klalim me-kitvei ha-ari, first paragraph)

(This is certainly not the religious path of the Rambam though.)

share|improve this answer
    
Tried to make things a bit clearer, feel free to edit as you wish.. –  Michoel Jan 29 '13 at 23:29
    
thank you. so why should we desire things like "arising the shechina from the afar" with our torah/mitzvot, such as in the leshem yichud. who are we helping? "the worlds"? –  ray Jan 30 '13 at 6:11
    
yes, divine worlds and the whole universe--I don't know if this is an attractive idea or not but it's out there in different forms in the teachings of those figures who base their thinking on kabbalistic sources. –  paquda Jan 30 '13 at 15:32
    
I hear. but it's difficult to feel any kind of motivation to help "worlds/partzufim". I can understand making people happy but benefiting "worlds" and "partzufim" where this doesn't make anyone nor even God "happy". what's the point of doing any religious service? –  ray Jan 30 '13 at 18:23
    
R Sebag, I mostly just meant if you were finding the path of the Rambam to not be speaking to you, you could look into this other path for a while and maybe find meaning in it. I'm not too knowledgeable about the specifics but I think 'benefiting worlds and partzufim' means that there are great processes happening and you can choose to involve yourself in them, that would be choosing 'avodah'. –  paquda Jan 31 '13 at 0:11
show 1 more comment

IT's not true that God not have emotions, It's misinterpretation of "God don't feel happiness or sadness". Actually One of God's Quality is eternal bliss. And he never loses it. He remains in Eternal content . Our actions are inspired from instantaneous motives and have temporary results .Hence he keeps himself remote from our actions although in some form or other he encourages us to do the right thing ,but it's our choice whether to follow his call or not.

share|improve this answer
4  
Hi Rishi and welcome to Mi Yodeya. Is this your own thought or did you hear it somewhere? If the latter, could you edit your answer to give the source? Thank you. –  Monica Cellio Jan 30 '13 at 14:59
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.