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I'm interested in making extensive notes on a siddur - for my own use, inspired partially by this recommendation. Are there any editions of the Siddur out there that include a great deal of white space, either explicitly for personal notes or just convenient for that?

I realize that the white space in many regular siddurim may be sufficient, but I'd like to have enough space without crowding into a small space or interfering with the actual text.

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Are you looking for a bound, print edition, or would printing your own (with whatever margins you like) and putting it in a binder work? –  Monica Cellio Oct 3 '12 at 3:42
    
I don't know of a sidur especially designed for it, but I personally have no problem fitting writing into my Artscroll (small edition) weekday sidur (mostly just changing the nusach of one word, but also sometimes some lengthy sentences, such as copying the "hareini mekabel alai," etc. from Chayei Adam (klal 1) –  b a Oct 3 '12 at 3:44
    
@MonicaCellio I suppose I'd be open to that option. –  Isaac Moses Oct 3 '12 at 3:45
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... though something bound already would certainly be easier. –  Isaac Moses Oct 3 '12 at 3:53
    
what nusach? +1 –  Charles Koppelman Oct 3 '12 at 5:43
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2 Answers

http://opensiddur.org/category/contributions/siddurim/ contains several whole siddurim whose copyright has expired. You can print out the PDFs and bind them however you'd like.

From the founder, in a comment below:

While we are engaged in the transcription of liturgical works that are historical and often pre-date 1923 (and the origin of Copyright law in general), most of the work that is being shared at the Open Siddur are work that are under Copyright but whose Copyright owners are sharing with special free-culture Copyright licenses permitting their adoption, adaptation, and redistribution so long as proper credit and attribution are provided.

--Aharon Varady, founding director/hierophant, the Open Siddur Project

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Also, you can see what is available on hebrewbooks.org - you can order prints from publishyoursefer.com –  Michoel Oct 3 '12 at 6:34
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Just a slight correction to what Charles wrote. While we are engaged in the transcription of liturgical works that are historical and often pre-date 1923 (and the origin of Copyright law in general), most of the work that is being shared at the Open Siddur are work that are under Copyright but whose Copyright owners are sharing with special free-culture Copyright licenses permitting their adoption, adaptation, and redistribution so long as proper credit and attribution are provided. --Aharon Varady, founding director/hierophant, the Open Siddur Project –  user3469 Nov 5 '13 at 20:37
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@aharonium, welcome to Mi Yodeya, and thanks for your correction. I hope you stick around and enjoy the site, including our 77 other sidur questions. –  msh210 Nov 6 '13 at 18:48
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Some children's siddurim leave a lot of space for writing,

This Artscroll leaves more room than most other siddurim

http://www.artscroll.com/Books/scha.html

I am sure if you go into a seforim store and look in their siddurim aisle, there would be more editions of a children's siddur with even more room.

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