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Can someone please explain the halachot for someone who wakes up after zman kriat shema? After zman tfillah?

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See also this –  b a Sep 2 '12 at 17:09
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Kitzur Shulcah Aruch1 17:1 says of the Sh'ma:

After a third of the day has passed, one should recite the Shema alone, without the blessings, because it is forbidden to recite the blessings beyond this time. The Shema itself, though, may be recited the entire day. (Other authorities also allow the recitation of the blessings throughout the day.)

A footnote on the last (parenthetical) sentence says that the Chatam Sofer permits the blessings until noon, and the Mishneh B'rurah (58; Biur Halochah) says if one was prevented by factors beyond one's control, he may recite the blessings until noon.

19:1 says of the t'filah:

However, after the fact, if one transgressed and delayed one's prayers [past the first third of the day], one may recite the Shemoneh Esrei until noon. This applies even if the delay was intentional. Though a person who recites the Shemoneh Esrei at this time does not receive the reward of one who prays at the required time, he still receives reward for prayer. If a person transgressed and intentionally did not pray until past noon, there is no way he can compensate for this act.

This is consistent with the g'mara on B'rachot 26, from which I assume it's derived.

I have not found anything that addresses the circumstances under which oversleeping would or would not be considered beyond one's control.

There is also halacha addressing making up an unintentionally-missed t'filah at mincha.

1 I typed these in from the print edition of Kitzur Shulchon Oruch by R' Shlomo Ganzfried trans. by R' Eliyahu Touger, Moznaim Publishing, 1991 (Amazon).

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Rav Wolbe in Alei Shur says that the preparation for shacharis is going to bed at the right time! –  Avrohom Yitzchok Sep 2 '12 at 21:22
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@AvrohomYitzchok agreed that this is the usual case. There's a spectrum from "stayed up until 4AM playing World of Warcraft" to "wow, that medicine my doctor prescribed to combat my fever was way more powerful than I thought; where'd the last 16 hours go?", and we don't know what caused any particular person to miss the zman without inquiring. –  Monica Cellio Sep 2 '12 at 23:30
    
Sof Zman Keriat Shema is 1/4 of the day. 1/3 of the day is Sof Zman Tefillah. –  Double AA Sep 3 '12 at 3:09
    
@MonicaCellio Super spectrum! Agreed. –  Avrohom Yitzchok Sep 3 '12 at 13:33
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