Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My siddur of choice is the סדור תפילת השלם but I am wondering about one bit of vocalization used therein.

In the davening of shacharit for both weekdays and shabbat, there is a sentence before shma which reads (without nekudot, intentionally)

תתברך...על שבח מעשה ידיך

on Shabbat, the second word is מושיענו while on weekdays, that word is replaced by יקוק אלֺקינו

While in the Artscroll and the siddur Rinat Yisrael, the nekudot under תתברך are the same, with a patach under the reish, in the Tfillat Hashalem, the weekday version reads with a tseirei (titbareich instead of titbarach) and not the patach of the Shabbat davening.

It is the same in all the copies of the siddur that I own and is clearly a choice, not a misimpression of a patach. Is there any any linguistic, grammatical, semantic or other distinction between the two words which would lead to a choice of one in one case, and the other in the other?

share|improve this question
2  
On weekdays you replace the weekday version? –  Double AA Aug 13 '12 at 21:14
1  
Dupe? judaism.stackexchange.com/q/8184/5 –  Seth J Aug 13 '12 at 21:14
    
@SethJ I don't think so IIUC his question is why during the week it's with a tzeirei and on shabbat it's a patach (or the other way around). That question is about doing one thing always; this is a question about variation within a personal practice. –  Double AA Aug 13 '12 at 21:24
    
@DoubleAA on weekdays the siddur has the text printed with the tseirei and in the shabbat section, the version with the patach is printed. Is it a function of the "moshi'einu" vs. "hashem elokeinu" or is it something else? –  Danno Aug 13 '12 at 21:38
    
Dan, check your question for typos. –  Seth J Aug 13 '12 at 21:42
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.