Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there an issue of publicly protesting a Jewish business, such as by picketing or boycotting, being a chilul Hashem? Are there any other (halachic or other) problems? What if you believe that the actions of the Jewish business constitute a chilul Hashem?

share|improve this question
    
Which Chillul Hashem is bigger? –  Double AA Jul 26 '12 at 16:44
    
Daniel, any reason you think protesting a Jewish-owned business's activity should be different from protesting a Jew's? –  msh210 Jul 26 '12 at 17:04
    
@msh210 I don't necessarily think they should be different. I don't think that I've suggested that I think they're different? –  Daniel Jul 26 '12 at 17:27
    
@Daniel, I ask only because you asked specifically about protesting against a business instead of asking what seems to me to be the more natural question of protesting against any Jew. –  msh210 Jul 26 '12 at 17:59
1  
@Daniel, could be. Personally, I don't recall the last time I protested against a business, whereas I've protested family members' wrongdoings several times in recent memory. –  msh210 Jul 26 '12 at 18:41
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

(This answer is to a previous version of the question, though it has some relevance to the current version also.)

The Bavli (Arachin 16:2) says:

Whence [the rule] that if one sees a despicable thing in his friend then he must admonish him? ― It says [in Vayikra 19:17], "Admonish".… Is it possibly true even if his face changes [from being shamed in public by the admonishment —Rashi]? ― It teaches us, saying [ibid.], "do not bear a sin because of him".

This is codified in Rambam also, who adds:

What are these things said about? Matters among people. But about divine matters, if he did not change his ways privately, we embarrass him publicly, publicizing his sin….

I see no reason to think a business owned by a Jew is different: after all, when you protest the business's action, what you're actually protesting is its proprietor's.

Of course, for practical guidance, consult your rabbi rather than relying on what you read on this site.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.