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Can one wear a new tie during nine days since it is not really a beged or do we say anything used to enhance a look is a problem?

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Why is it not a beged? Do you mean, 'since it doesn't touch skin'? If so, it's a good question, and it applies to more cases than a tie. –  Double AA Jul 20 '12 at 5:18
    
@DoubleAA The Shulchan Aruch writes in the laws of brachos (in the siman dealing with Shehechiyanu, IIRC) that you don't say shehechiyanu on socks, because they're only (unimportant) socks. Maybe you are therefore allowed to buy them in the Nine Days. And maybe ties have the same ruling as socks –  b a Jul 20 '12 at 5:27
    
@ba Wait wait wait. Are you asking about buying a new tie and shehechiyanu, or wearing a new tie because of laundering? –  Double AA Jul 20 '12 at 5:28
    
I'm silly. @ba != sam. sam, can you clarify what you are asking per the above comments? –  Double AA Jul 20 '12 at 5:46
    
@ba - Don't you think that ties are much more chashuv than socks? –  Adam Mosheh Jul 20 '12 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

Sefer Avnei Yashfei Chelek 1:217 holds that a tie is considered a beged and if has shatnez its a problem.

In Chelek 5:46:3 He writes that a tie is like a malbush in regards to having a Shabbas tie set aside.

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The Ohr Somayach website says the following:

While wearing new clothing that doesn’t require the blessing “sh’hecheyanu” is permitted until the 1st of Av, during the nine days it is prohibited even on Shabbat.

I think it is reasonable to classify a tie as clothing over which we do not make “sh’hecheyanu”.

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Is a belt or tie considerd clothing, that is my question. –  sam Jul 20 '12 at 17:59
    
In a discussion relating to men wearing women’s clothes and vice versa, torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5770/purim.html says, “Lo yilbash includes wearing even one garment that is specifically worn by the other gender. It is forbidden, for instance, for a woman to wear a man’s hat, belt, tie or shoes even if the rest of her clothing is clearly feminine and she is clearly identifiable as a woman.” This shows that at least in the “Lo yilbash” context both ties and belts are clothing. –  Avrohom Yitzchok Jul 22 '12 at 9:26

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