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How should a heh with a schwa under it be pronounced in an intermediate position in a word? E.g. פדהאל, or נהדר

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Even thought I know certain People wont like this see what the Rema in his Teshvos says about Dikduk –  SimchasTorah May 31 '10 at 22:28
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Is there a specific t'shuva you would recommend on the topic? Thanks –  WAF Jun 1 '10 at 1:02
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YS, do us a favor and at least tell us which Teshuvah. If you want to be real nice then give us a link to the page. There are two prints of Teshuvos Rema at hebrewbooks.org. –  Yahu Jun 1 '10 at 1:11
    
@Yahu WAF: I think he means Teshuva 7, but I'm not sure. –  Double AA Jun 28 '12 at 7:50
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

פדהצור is actually not such a good example, because it doesn't have a sheva under the ה; there's no question, then, that it would be silent (like the ה at the end of the words תורה, מצוה, etc.). Perhaps you're thinking of פדהאל (Num. 34:28).

As I understand it, there should be an audible puff of breath in these cases - i.e., "neh-dar" (not "ne-dar"), "p'-dah-el" (not "p'-da-el"), etc. The closest English analogue I can think of is the dismissive "aah" (as in "never mind").

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I have the same mesorah from my father, from his father who taught dikduk in Yeshivah University. (He held a doctorate in Semitic Languages). The way my father taught me is that the first syllable in נהדר should end with an audible heh, i.e. neh-dar. –  Yahu Jun 1 '10 at 20:10
    
My mistake. פדהאל is indeed probably what I was thinking of. Emended! –  WAF Jun 2 '10 at 22:44
    
Just noticed this posting, which is interesting and potentially related: considerthesource2.blogspot.com/2010/07/… –  WAF Jul 22 '10 at 2:47
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