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I live 3000km from shul and take conversion classes remotely. I am learning from Koren Siddur. Because I do not ever hear how the words should be spoken, I sometimes wonder if it is a waste of time. I will probably need to learn it again, when we move to a community.

I wonder if any of you know any good recordings to learn from?

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Do you know which tradition of pronunciation you are looking for? Ashkenazi? Sephardi? Teimani? –  Double AA May 23 '12 at 16:46
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There are 12000 sq km in this world without a single bet chabad? –  Baal Shemot Tovot May 23 '12 at 16:52
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@Vram Sounds more like 28,274,333.9 km^2 from this post. –  Double AA May 23 '12 at 16:55
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Chabad.org offers a variety of recordings of prayers and songs, in different pronunciations. Not all prayers are available in all pronunciations, though you can learn the general sounds from your chosen pronunciation, even if it's the wrong prayer. chabad.org/multimedia/media_cdo/aid/290078/jewish/Prayer.htm –  HodofHod May 23 '12 at 17:33
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@Ari A, Yes I have been thinking about an interlinear Siddur. However, I find that if I use a dictionary I learn quicker as I have to work with the text a lot harder. The down point is of cause inflectional morphemes are hard some times, and can change the meaning drastically. Thanks. –  Millthorn May 24 '12 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I haven't vetted these but they might be worth working through

I just ran a google search and found a bunch. I also know that too much information can be as problematic as too little. You should ask your Rabbi to recommend a resource for audio files.

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Excellent! Thank you so much. I have been looking every where, but as you said information overload is problematic. –  Millthorn May 23 '12 at 17:16

Danno's answer pretty much covers it. I would also recommend:http://www.ramaz.org/nusach/index.html, especially for good Ashkenazi davening. If you want resources for leining (reading Torah), this is a good website: http://learntrope.com/

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Also try "Virtual Cantor": http://www.virtualcantor.com. It has .mp3 files that can be downloaded.

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The best recording will come from your own community because it will reflect your local pronunciation. (Ashkenazi? Sephardi? Israeli?) Is your sponsoring rabbi (or some other reliable person he suggests) able to spend half an hour to make you a recording? Is there a telephone component to your remote study?

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Thanks! Probably, Ashkenazi. I'm from Europe living for the moment in Australia. My Rebbe has lots of students, and is very bussy learning Torah, and I have mentioned the problem to him. He suggests that I have to do the best I can until my wife and I move to a community. –  Millthorn May 23 '12 at 16:53
    
Do you ever visit this community, or is this 100% remote? It sounds like he's too busy to take the iniative to make you a recording, but if you show up (on a weekday, obviously) with a recording device in hand and ask him to recommend someone to help you, you're likely to get good results. Somebody approached me with a tape recorder once and I was happy to oblige, for what that's worth. –  Monica Cellio May 23 '12 at 17:12
    
I'm in Australia my Rebbe is i Israel. I wish I could afford going there soon. However, I have contact with an Orthodox Rabbi in Adelaide. I might be able to ask him if I get the opportunity to meet him soon. Thanks! –  Millthorn May 23 '12 at 17:24
    
Oh, yikes -- yeah, that's rather a longer distance than I was imagining. :-) (Australia's a big place, so I was thinking one end of the continent to the other...) –  Monica Cellio May 23 '12 at 17:36
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@Millthorn You should be aware that your converting rabbi(s) will probably require you to move to a Jewish community within walking distance of a synagogue. –  Seth J May 23 '12 at 17:57

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