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If you are eating a piece of cheesecake which consists of a thin crust and mostly cheese filling - what Bracha do you make on it?

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Hopefully you'll have already made one before you started! –  Seth J May 22 '12 at 15:13
    
hatov v'hameitiv :) –  Charles Koppelman May 22 '12 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

shehakol is indicated here http://westmountshul.com/documents/Review%20Sheet%2014.pdf (example 11)

on the hashakafa.com thread (http://www.hashkafah.com/index.php?/topic/25916-bracha-for-cheesecake/) the OU opinion is quoted. It seems to say that for a thin-dough crust, shehakol is appropriate.

Cheese Cake Mezonot As with all cakes, the dough is considered the primary ingredient and only Mezonot is necessary (Mishnah Berurah 212:1), even if there is less dough than cheese, and even if the cake is eaten mainly because of the cheese. On the other hand, if there is merely a thin strip of dough, which is intended just to help you handle all the cheese, the dough becomes subordinate to the cheese and only Shehakol need be said.

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I've never heard of a cheesecake wherein the crust was used merely to keep one's hand clean when holding the cheese. The crust is always an integral part of the flavor of the cake. So I'm not aware of any case where shehakol is warranted for our cheesecakes, unless you don't eat the crust at all. –  Curiouser May 22 '12 at 17:11
    
while I don;t know what standard the OU uses, and I would never, personally, call a graham cracker crust a "dough", I wonder if the difference is between this 3.bp.blogspot.com/_FL66goStEQU/S42Oudbu_4I/AAAAAAAADyo/… and this stickygooeycreamychewy.com/wp-content/uploads/HLIC/… –  Danno May 22 '12 at 18:56

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