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I was recently at a shiur where this came up briefly and somewhat tangentially. Does anyone know which groups forbid rice but allow other kitniyot (e.g., beans) during Pesach? Any references/pointers to the halakhic literature and the reasoning here for this would be appreciated.

A related, but less specific question, was posed here.

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I've seen a Persian custom that permits rice but forbids beans (and chickpeas)- seemingly the exact opposite. –  Baal Shemot Tovot May 20 '12 at 21:18
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@هه Any halakhic sources for this? I think it'd be helpful to flesh out the distinction that was made amongst these different groups? –  minhag May 20 '12 at 21:25
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Ive heard that Hummus sounds like Hametz, so they made it assur (but i have no written source for that). I don't know when the beans-custom began or how widespread it is. Don't be surprised if Persian Jews adopted customs out of ignorance- certain cities lacked proper Torah leadership for several decades. Incidents such as this also impaired the transfer of minhagim from generation to the next. –  Baal Shemot Tovot May 20 '12 at 21:34
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3 Answers 3

The Jews of Bagdad and Morocco stayed away from rice because they were afraid that it was mixed with wheat.

See Ben Ish Chai Tzav 41 , Rav Pe’alim 3:30

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I am a Jew of Spanish Morrocan ancestry - my father always told me that Moroccons and actal Spanish Jews never ate kitniyot including rice itself unless they were fresh and green - the reason -Spain was close to Ashkenaz and the gzeira of kitniyot crossed the border and true Sepharadic Jews (Spanish as opposed to Jews of Arab lands) accepted the gzeira, as did Jews of Spanish Morrocco.

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Turkish Jews and also some of the Balkan communities do not eat rice or other kidniyot. As well, certain other products, such as fresh cheese, were avoided; but more products are being produced now in Israel so are edible. But the minhag of not eating kidniyot continues for most Turkish Jews.

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vitali varol, welcome to Mi Yodeya and thank you for pointing that out. Can you perhaps indicate how you know this? Personal experience perhaps? I will also encourage you to register your account to gain full access to the site. I look forward to seeing you around! –  Double AA Jul 16 '12 at 20:56
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