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We are setting up a new (money) Gemach. To register as a charity, a bank account is now needed. We were told of this on Thursday around noon. We were unable (too busy getting ready for Yom Tov) to get to the bank on Thursday. Friday is a bank holiday. Are we allowed to open the account on Chol HaMoed?

On the one hand it seems that the answer to this question (already posed to the Rav but no answer yet) should be No because we are arranging to do the work on Chol HaMoed. On the other hand it is a need for the community and a need for a mitzva.

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But you aren't delaying until Chol HaMoed specifically; it sounds like this will be the first opportunity you get! –  Double AA Apr 6 '12 at 16:44
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The usual rubric for answering this question is whether there's a financial loss involved.

If you can postpone the trip to the bank until after Hol HaMoed without losing money, then you should. If not, then it's mutar to do it on Hol HaMoed.

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In this cae, the possible loss is presumably to the potential borrowers: they won't be able to get a loan until after Yom Tov. So that might be reason enough for it to be considered a davar ha-aveid. –  Alex Apr 6 '12 at 19:12
    
What are you basing this on? We definately don't apply this to every mitzvah (if I work on shabbat I'll earn more!). What's the guideline for use of this heter? –  Baal Shemot Tovot Apr 6 '12 at 22:22
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Financial loss is a justification for permitting melacha that would otherwise be forbidden on Hol HaMoed. Loss of a potential profit is generally not a justification for permitting melacha that would otherwise be forbidden on Hol HaMoed. –  Chanoch Apr 9 '12 at 2:15
    
Our Rav answered that since we have no-one waiting on a loan (Boruch HaShem) during the Moed, we should delay the visit to the bank. –  Avrohom Yitzchok Apr 10 '12 at 10:14
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