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{Kedei Kelipah is a term used in Kashruth for the amount of something that needs to be removed in order to allow one to treat the remnant as Kosher. (This only applies under certain conditions, which are outside the scope of this question - at least I happen to believe it is outside the scope of this question, but feel free to bring it into your answer if you think it is necessary.)}


What exactly is a Kedei Kelipah, and how big is it? How does one remove it, and how does one remove it if the item in question is very thin itself?

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My father told me a onion skin (don't have a source). –  Hacham Gabriel Mar 4 '12 at 1:41
    
@hachamgabriel, as a measurement of thickness, or as an example of a single-peel item? –  Seth J Mar 4 '12 at 6:39
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It was explained to me as a single layer thick enough to peel off in one piece. (Cannot source.)

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cannot source in any written text; this is what i heard from my teacher. It matches with various examples of kelipa in the bet yosef, but I know of no explicit written source that says just this –  Baal Shemot Tovot May 7 '12 at 3:53
    
If it helps, this is what I was told as well. –  HodofHod Apr 22 '13 at 14:49
    
@HodofHod me too......... –  Shmuel Brin Aug 7 '13 at 4:50
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The piece that swallowed the issur has to be cut out in one piece without causing any crumbs this the definition of kdei klipah(see Schach siman 96:7,and Chachmas Adom klal 42:11 ,Kdei netilah is 2 centimeters(see Shulchan Aruch YD siman 105:4) for picture see sefer Basar Bechalav - Madrich Hilchati-Hebrew Halacha pg.42.

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