Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to Wikipedia, this is Gnocchi: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnocchi

How do I know which beracha to make considering it is made from potatoes and is not a normal pasta? Should I just stick to she'hakol?

share|improve this question
    
It is pasta. Can you give some reason why you think it should be anything but Mezonoth? –  Seth J Mar 2 '12 at 8:28
    
If you read the wiki, it explains how it's made from Potatoes –  Nathan H Mar 2 '12 at 9:46
    
Ok, but put that into the question. –  Seth J Mar 2 '12 at 11:51
    
Wouldn't it depend on the ingredients in a particular gnocchi recipe? –  Double AA Aug 12 '12 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

Gnocchi seem to be a form of pasta. See here 1, if made from the five species of grain (wheat, barley, rye, oat or spelt), make "mezonot".

If made from one of the five species and potatoes (or anything else for that matter), we need to know why one of the five species was used. (See here 2).

If it is added to add taste or nutrition AND it can be tasted – it would be the main part (ikar) and the brocho on the gnocchi is Mezonot.

If it is merely added as a binding ingredient to maintain a certain consistency – it would be secondary (tofel) and the brocho on the gnocchi would be shehakol.

Regarding saying shehakol in a doubtful situation, see here 3 which says, if you don't know which bracha to say because you didn't learn the halachot, you may not rely on on your lack of knowledge to say shehakol.. Rather, you should go and learn the halacha (or ask an authority) and then say the proper bracha.

Best is, of course, to CYLOR.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe the questioner is asking what to do when it is made from both. As it often is. –  avi Feb 26 '12 at 14:31
    
@avi Thanks. I have updated the answer to take account of your point. –  Avrohom Yitzchok Feb 26 '12 at 16:15
    
...and if made from only potatos say Shehakol. –  Double AA Feb 26 '12 at 16:28
    
About the penultimate paragraph: "go and learn the halacha" is the right thing to strive for, but that doesn't help when the plate of food is in front of you. The person in this situation needs to know what to do by default until he learns better. –  Monica Cellio Feb 26 '12 at 18:22
    
@MonicaCellio My source is "The Halochos of Brochos" Rabbi Y P Bodner p234 (from the Shulchan Oruch - from the Gemoro). Unless I bypass the problem I may not eat the food until I know the brocho. Here the question will be whether the gnocchi need a brocho of Mezonot or Shehakol. By making these brochos first on other foods that I also want to eat (say a biscuit and a piece of cheese) with intention to cover the gnocchi in front of me, I will have solved the problem. –  Avrohom Yitzchok Feb 26 '12 at 22:15

Gnocchi is a type of pasta. Though it might also have mashed up potatoes in it (which would lead one to think "shehakol") it still has substantial amounts of flour which, I would think, makes it a mezonos.

share|improve this answer
    
according to this recipe, it's 1 c. flour for 2 lbs potatoes. It serves 6, which means each serving has 1/6 c flour. Is that enough for mezonot to be primary? –  Charles Koppelman Aug 13 '12 at 14:55
    
I don't know what counts to make flour an ikkar, but I saw this berachot.org/Q+A/index.html -- question 34. The distinction the author made was that flour would be listed if there was "a substantial amount (meaning it comes up as one of the first several ingredients)". If you were to list all the ingredients in your gnocchi recipe by volume, flour would still rank rather high on the list. –  Danno Aug 13 '12 at 21:02
    
Mod Note: This answer was penned to a different version of this question and moved hither. –  Double AA Aug 15 '12 at 6:37

Just to add on to Avrohom Yitzchok's answer with a source: See here where it is quoted from the Sefer שערי הברכה that Gnocchi is Mezonos / Al Hamichya.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.