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Purim Torah seems to be a two sided concept. On one hand, many people do it for many years (for example, Maseches Purim was published in 1871).

On the other hand, it seems to be a Bizayon HaTorah (disgracing Torah) as one is making fun of Torah and its svaros (logic).


Did any famous Rabbonim talk about it?

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Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/6306/5 –  Seth J Feb 22 '12 at 20:44
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Check this out: hebrewbooks.org/… –  jake Feb 22 '12 at 20:55
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Depends what exactly is done and how. There are stories of Big Rabonim who were "Rav Purim" and gave some sort of "Purim Shpiel", but it was done without Bizayon. Rav Kook, I think, would be brought two unconnected Gemara pages and would turn them into one Sugya. –  JNF Oct 2 '12 at 21:35

2 Answers 2

According to this website (all brackets excluding footnotes added),

As many other books this [i.e. Maseches Purim] to [sic] was banned, by many, most notably R. Shmuel Aboab (siman 193). Others who opposed these works were authors of Chemdas Hayomim, Beris Mateh Moshe and the Chida.[16] At some points certain versions of Mesechtas Purim were even burned![17]

(His main reference is the book Parody in Jewish Literature, available online here. Rabbi Shmu'el Abuhab is here.)

This website says that Rabbi Ya'akov Yisra'el Kanievski wrote a Maseches Purim when he was young (though when it quotes Rabbi Abuhab it has the incorrect place as is obvious to whomever looks there).

More information and related links can be found here and here (yes, the last one is in Yiddish, but if you just click the links given and look at the pictures you can probably figure it out without knowing Yiddish).

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The Chida writes in his Maagal Tov that when he was in Amsterdam he was by their Seudas Purim. He quotes the Purim Torah. It is obvious which on e he liked and which one he found cheap. He referred to the first one who stood up as a Letz that said a Shiur Meluchlach. The second one who got up, was a Talmud Chacham, and said a Pilpul, albeit a cute one.

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Hi HaLeiVi and welcome to Mi Yodeya. Thanks for this answer, hope to see you around the site. –  user2110 Feb 12 '13 at 15:28

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